Thought, fact and quote 4the day 20/1/12
Seven Acre Horse Sanctuary - Giving horses/ponies a second chance..
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Thought, fact and quote 4the day 20/1/12

Thought 4the day: Assessments.... how do we assess each horse its never the same they are all different and on different levels of learning or rehabilitation. How do we know when there ready its when they are not jumping at every movement, looking for human contact not fearing it. If they were ill they need to be recovered. Then what do we do. If they are ridable we assess as to what stage they ar...e at by treating them as if they are green and just seeing how far they can or need to go before they get scared if at all. The ground work is first thou. Like can we pick their feet up, touch them all over, tack them up, are they ticklish, i could go on! Its endless. The thought and point being when they are ready they tell us just as your horse, pony , donkey or any animal tells you what is wrong or when things have changed and they are ready to move on.
 
 
Fact4 the day:
Eyes
A horse with pig eye has unusually small eyes. This is primarily an aesthetic issue, but claimed by some to be linked to stubbornness or nervousness, and thought to decrease the horse's visual field.

Jaw size
... The lower jaw should be clearly defined. The space between the two sides of the jawbone should be wide, with room for the larynx and muscle attachments. The width should be 7.2 cm, about the width of a fist.
The jaw is called narrow if the width is less than 7.2 cm.
The jaw is called large if it is greater than 7.2 cm. A large jaw gives head a false appearance of being short and adds weight to the head. Too large of a jaw can cause a reduction to the horse's ability to flex at the poll to bring his head and neck into proper position for collection and to help balance.

Jaw position
A parrot mouth is an overbite, where the upper jaw extends further out than the lower jaw. This can affect the horse's ability to graze. Parrot mouth is common and can be managed with regular teeth floating by a veterinarian.
A monkey mouth, sow mouth, or bulldog mouth is an underbite, where the lower jaw extends further out than the upper jaw. This is less common than parrot mouth. This can affect the horse's ability to graze. Monkey mouth is common and can be managed with regular teeth floating by a veterinarian.

Ears
Ears should be proportional to the head. They should be set just below the level of the poll at the top of the head. Ears should be a position where they can be rotated forward and backward. Ears that are too large or too small may make the head seem too small or large in proportion with the body.
 
Quote 4the day: "Yet when the books have read and reread, it boils down to the horse, his human companion, and what goes on between them." ~Walter Farley
 
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