Thought, fact and quote for the day 5/4/12
Seven Acre Horse Sanctuary - Giving horses/ponies a second chance..
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Thought, fact and quote for the day 5/4/12

Thought 4the day: Word of mouth... We seem to be getting a lot of it lately where people are telling people to contact us. I have to afmit where we stayed hidden concentrating on all the horses for many years it still shocks me! It is very welcome as we would help anyone to the best of our ability its what we are here for! But it still makes me take a step back in shock! We are taking in more and ...more horses but on the flip side rehoming more as well as they are flourishing and finding their hooves and then finding a match. It has to be a match by interaction and yet so much more that words cannot describe but they eyes and every part of you feel. Each horse is unique. I am wondering what our numbers will be this year by the end as we have taken in 17 so far and its only march and i know of a possible 5 coming in over the next week. That takes us to one below our whole of last years numbers.... they are all welcome. I might start taking bets on how many walk though the gates! Thank god thou i have not walked down the yard to find a horse tied to the gate!!!!!
 
Quote 4the day:
If you live a life without horses-
You don’t live a life at all…
 
Fact 4the day: Other coat colors

**A black horse Black: Black is relatively uncommon, though not "rare." There are two types of black, fading black and non-fading black. Most black horses will fade to a brownish color if the horse is exposed to sunlight on a regular basis. Non-fading black is a blue-black shade that does not fade in the sun. Genetically, the two cannot yet be differentiated, and some claim the difference occurs due to management rather than genetics, though this claim is hotly disputed. Most black foals are usually born a mousy grey or dun color. As their foal coat begins to shed out, their black color will show through, though in some breeds black foals are born jet black. For a horse to be considered black, it must be completely black except for white markings. A sun-bleached black horse is still black, even though it may appear to be a dark bay or brown. A visible difference between a true black and a dark chestnut or bay is seen in the fine hairs around the eyes and muzzle; on a true black these hairs are black, even if the horse is sun-bleached, on other colors, they will be lighter.
**Brindle - One of the rarest colors in horses, possibly linked to chimerism. Characteristics are any color with "zebra-like" stripes, but most common is a brown horse with faint yellowish markings.
**A buckskin Buckskin- A bay horse with one copy of the cream gene, a dilution gene that 'dilutes' or fades the coat color to a yellow, cream, or gold while keeping the black points (mane, tail, legs).
** Champagne: Produced by a different dilution gene than the cream gene. It lightens both skin and hair, but creates a metallic gold coat color with mottled skin and light colored eyes. Champagne horses are often confused with palomino, cremello, dun, or buckskins.
**Cream dilution, an incomplete dominant gene that produces a partially diluted coat color with one copy of the allele and a full dilution with two copies. Colors produced include Palomino, Buckskin, Perlino, Cremello and Smoky Cream or Smoky black.
**Cremello - A horse with a chestnut base coat and two cream genes that wash out almost all color until the horse is a pale cream or light tan color. Often called "white," they are not truly white horses, and they do not carry the white (W) gene. A cremello usually has blue eyes.
**Dun: Yellowish or tan coat with primitive markings, sometimes called "dun factors:" a darker-colored mane and tail, a dorsal stripe along the back and occasionally faint horizontal zebra stripings on the upper legs and a possible transverse stripe across the withers. There are several variations of dun: Grullo, Grulla, or Blue Dun: A horse with a black base color and the dun gene. Coat is solid "mouse-colored" gray or silver with black or dark gray primitive markings.
**Red dun: A chestnut base coat with dun factors. Coat is usually pale yellow or tan with chestnut (red) primitive markings.
**"Bay dun" or "Zebra dun" are terms sometimes used to describe the classic dun color of yellow or tan with black primitive markings, used when necessary to distinguish it from red duns or grullos.
**"Buckskin dun" or "Yellow dun" describes a dun that also carries the cream gene dilution and has a coat of pale gold with black mane, tail, legs and primitive markings.
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