Thought, fact and quote for the day 21/8/12
Seven Acre Horse Sanctuary - Giving horses/ponies a second chance..
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Thought, fact and quote for the day 21/8/12

Thought 4the day: As we get older we get stiffer and sometimes the cold and things will agrivate all of this. The same goes for our four legged friends as they mature in their golden oldie years. We have one horse here who is sound through the warmer months and as the colder ones start to creep in he stiffens to the point he can become lame. Have your golden oldies shown anything as they mature? If so what are you doing for them to make them more comfy? Its def worth a thought :o)
 
 
Quote 4the day: When your horse is feeling like a slow day let them after all we get those days where we would love to be under a duvet all day :o)
 
 
 
Fact 4the day: Like humans, horses are susceptible to sunburn, especially on the non-pigmented pink-skinned areas of the body. Sunburn is most frequently seen around the eyes and on the muzzle of pale or white-faced horses. The skin condition photosensitization (a sensitivity to sun exposure) is different from sunburn in that it often affects both pigmented and nonpigmented areas of the body....
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The skin is the largest organ of the body. It serves to protect internal structures from a variety of environmental stimuli. In the summer months this is an especially vital organ for fending off a barrage of flies and the relenting summer sun.

Like humans, horses are susceptible to sunburn, especially on the non-pigmented pink-skinned areas of the body. Sunburn is most frequently seen around the eyes and on the muzzle of pale or white-faced horses. For this reason many of the breeds that most frequently suffer from sunburn include Paints, Pintos, and Appaloosas, as well as many cremellos and other horses with pale coat colors.

The skin condition photosensitization (a sensitivity to sun exposure) is different from sunburn in that it often affects both pigmented and nonpigmented areas of the body. Photosensitizing agents include, but are not limited to, St. John's wort, ragwort, buckwheat, perennial ryegrass, sulfa antibiotics, and tetracyclines. Clover (mostly alsike and red) as well as alfalfa are linked to secondary photosensitivity due to liver damage, which can occur from heavy ingestion of these plants. Photosensitization also can secondarily result from liver damage due to bacterial, viral, or fungal infections and even liver cancers.

Skin lesions, primarily around the eyes and nostrils, are the first signs owners often see when sunburn or photosensitization occurs. Affected skin often peels or appears scaly and redder than surrounding pale skin (areas devoid of pigmentation). In severe cases horses might even develop blisters and leak serum (clear to yellowish fluid) from the damaged skin, just as with a deep sunburn in humans.

Most frequently I see sunburn when an owner complains that his or her horse is suddenly head shy. Anyone who has ever suffered the painful effects of sunburn should be able to understand easily why a horse suffering one on his face would be reluctant to wear a halter or bridle.
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