Thought, fact and quote for the day 5/9/12
Seven Acre Horse Sanctuary - Giving horses/ponies a second chance..
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Thought, fact and quote for the day 5/9/12

Thought 4the day: For years we have used one type of horse feed mixed with sugarbeet, herbs and barley rings for those that have needed it with herbal molly chop to finish. Lately a few seem not to be able to digest this that have come in so gaining weight was slow. With some research and also finding out more about the feed we have moved over too (slowly for the horses sake) from a reliable sourc...e that uses it and promotes it by the way their horses stand out looking great we have moved ours over. We are now using Pure Feed Easy for them all with herbs still (even though they come with so many in!!) sugarbeet and barley rings. Results should be amazing. Sometimes its worth changing the horses diet to make them happy and comfortable so that they can flourish :o)
 
 
 
Fact 4the day: The Westphalian, or Westfalen, is a warmblood horse bred in the Westphalia region of western Germany. The Westphalian is closely affiliated with the state-owned stud farm of Warendorf, which it shares with the Rhinelander. Since World War II, the Westphalian horse has been bred to the same standard as the other German warmbloods, and they are particularly famous as Olympic-level sho...w jumpers and dressage horses. Next to the Hanoverian, the Westphalian studbook has the largest breeding population of any warmblood in Germany.

History
Warendorf

The history of the Westphalian horse is linked with the State Stud of Warendorf, which was founded in 1826 to serve the North Rhine-Westphalian region. The stud was built under the Prussian Stud Administration, which was put together by King Frederick William I in 1713 to improve horse breeding efforts in the German-speaking region. Government-owned studs, identified as "State" or "Principal" studs depending on whether the facility keeps its own herd of mares, purchase stallions that fit the needs of the surrounding region. The stud fees of state-owned stallions are low, enabling local breeders to produce high-quality horses from heavy drafts to riding horses to ponies.

The first stallions to stand at Warendorf were from East Prussia, and so were similar to Trakehners of the time. These horses were riding horses with Thoroughbred blood, suitable for the courtiers to ride and use in cavalry. As the human population between the Rhine and Weser rivers grew, the demand shifted to a medium-heavy all-purpose farm horse to cope with the increase in agriculture. The noble East Prussian stallions were replaced with heavy warmbloods from Oldenburg and East Frisia.

The turn of the 20th century saw the heavy warmbloods outdone in the region by the more suitable Rhenish Cold Blood. These horses were better able to pull heavy plows and artillery, and so while they were principally bred around the Wickrath State Stud, warmblood sires at Warendorf were gradually replaced by cold bloods. The revolutions in automotive and agricultural technology that these heavy horses helped make possible made them obsolete in turn. In 1957 the Wickrath State Stud was dissolved as the heavy horses fell out of favor.The stock of warmblood horses was replenished with mares and stallions from nearby Hannover, on which the modern Westphalian is based.

The Federal Riding School was incorporated to the state stud in 1968. It is the site of the training and examination of nationally-licensed professional riders and instructors, and is also home to the German Equestrian Olympic Committee. Warendorf also hosts stallion performance tests annually.
 
 
 
Quote 4the day: Try different things as not all the horses like the same things as others. They all have different needs and tastes!!
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